Can I Give My Dog Ibuprofen?

  • By Raquel Astacio

Dog sniffing ibuprofen pills

For dogs and other pets, ibuprofen has a narrow safety margin that could induce toxicosis (health problems due to poisoning). In fact, a review of ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center calls found that the most common medication causing dog poisoning was ibuprofen. Coated ibuprofen tablets taste particularly sweet to dogs, which encourages them to eat as many ibuprofen tablets as they can. In addition, calls to the ASPCA APCC also included owners giving their dogs ibuprofen because they thought it was safer than giving them aspirin.

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Home Remedies for Dog Vomiting

  • By Raquel Astacio

Sick golden retriever puppy

Vomiting in dogs occurs when the dog’s body wants to get rid of something that shouldn’t be in the body. Dog owners know how difficult it is to stop their dogs from suddenly gulping down unsavory debris found outside. It’s just plain instinct that compels dogs and other wild-turned-domesticated animals to eat anything that smells or tastes strong. Dogs may also throw up when they have an illness or disease.

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Tick Prevention for Dogs

  • By Raquel Astacio

Dog being given tick preventative shampoo

Ticks are neither spiders nor insects but parasitic arthropods with jointed legs and external skeletons. Belonging to the mite group, tick species number in the thousands worldwide but only a few spread diseases to animals and humans. When ticks “bite” animals, only mouthparts pierce the skin. They do not burrow their bodies into the skin. Ticks feed on both mammalian and reptilian blood. However, ticks that feed on snake and lizard blood cannot “cross over” to animal blood.

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Can Dogs Eat Sauerkraut?

  • By Raquel Astacio

Sauerkraut in a jar on a table

Sauerkraut is finely cut, fresh cabbage that has been fermented with several types of lactic acid bacteria. Eaten alone or used to flavor hot dogs, casseroles and meat dishes, sauerkraut is also a nutritious food that dogs can eat safely. Since most dogs won’t eat sauerkraut by itself, creative dog owners have found ways to incorporate sauerkraut into their pet’s food so strong smell and taste doesn’t bother a dog’s sensitive nose and palate.

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Symptoms of Lyme Disease in Dogs

  • By Raquel Astacio

Cocker Spaniel having tick removed

Transmitted to dogs when they are bitten by infected deer ticks. Lyme disease produces immediate symptoms in only about five to 10 percent of affected dogs. Deer ticks must be infected with a spirochete bacteria belonging to the Borrelia burgdorferi group to cause illness in dogs.

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Pyometra in Dogs

  • By Raquel Astacio

Pyometra in dogs

A secondary infection arising from hormonal changes within an unspayed dog’s reproductive tract, pyometra may be diagnosed in middle-aged, intact female dogs but is more commonly found in older dogs. Pyometra in dogs is a serious infection requiring surgical treatment involving removal of infected ovaries and uterus (ovariohysterectomy or “spay”). Signs of pyometra generally emerge two weeks to two months following the last heat cycle (estrus).

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Heat Stroke in Dogs

  • By Raquel Astacio

Overheated dog by pond

A dog’s normal body temperature is between 99.5F. and 102.5F. A body temperature over 103° F may indicate the dog has a slight fever. However, a temperature exceeding 105° F. indicates a dog is suffering from heat stroke (hyperthermia), a dangerous condition leading to organ failure and death if not promptly reversed.

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Why Do Dogs Eat Poop & How To Stop This Behavior

  • By Raquel Astacio

Dog with coprophagia eating poop in the grass

Dog owners witnessing their pets eating their own fecal matter usually swoop in and make their dog stop eating poop immediately. However, if they knew why dogs eat poop, they might not view this behavior as something repulsive. In fact, learning about why dogs eat poop can provide insight into their dog’s health and prevent a potential disease or disorder from progressing by getting veterinary treatment for their pet.

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Pain Relief for Dogs

  • By Raquel Astacio

Labrador Retriever at veterinary clinic

Seeing your furry best friend in pain is the worst. When a family member is sick and in pain, it hurts and you just want to make it right. The same applies to our own dogs as they are part of our families too.

You may want to give your dog some sort of over-the-counter medication to treat them right away. But that can actually do more harm than good. The same pain relief remedies that humans take cannot be given to canines. Doing so is dangerous and can put their health at risk.

But before you can treat your dog, how do you know if he’s actually in pain?

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Home Remedies for Fleas

  • By Raquel Astacio

Dog rolling on grass and scratching off fleas

Next to cockroaches and bed bugs, fleas are the most resilient and prolific of insects. Thriving in warm, humid conditions, fleas need one thing to survive–blood. Fleas also require victims with fairly dense body hair so they can cling to strands of hair, crawl down to skin surfaces and begin feeding. Fur also protects them from being easily scratched or bitten off the skin by dogs, cats, and other hairy mammals.

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